MCAS & Triggers: How To Check Your Medicines (In 7 Easy Steps!)

Did you know that the inactive ingredients in your medicines, even the ones prescribed for mast cell disease, could be full of your personal food and chemical triggers?

Did you know that there is a website you can go to that has everything you need to know about your medicines so that you can make an informed decision as a mast cell disease patient?

Thankfully there really is such a site. My immunologist told me about it and I have found it’s an indispensable tool for people like myself with allergies or mast cell dysfunction.

To get started, click over to Daily Med. The rest is easy. If you need help, just follow my handy-dandy visual guide below!

First, click on the “Advanced Search” tab at the top of the page. This gives you more parameters and options. Type in the name of the drug exactly as it is spelled on your prescription:

Then,  click “SEARCH”;

A list will come up with all of the different versions of your drug. Scroll down until you find yours. There are two ways to do this:

Once you have it, click open the link and scroll down to “Ingredients & Appearance”:

When you scroll down, you’ll see a list of the inactive ingredients. Here’s where the triggers often lie for us. Remember, they are listed in order of most to least, from top to bottom:

This can help you to find medicines with the least amount of triggers, or hopefully none at all. Remember, we are all different so while I may be triggered by dairy, soy and corn, the next person may be fine with all or some of these but could be sensitive to Red #40. YMMV.

Also please remember this is not medical advice. If you believe you have mast cell or any other disease see a doctor right away. For those of us with MCAS, though, this disease is very individual and very complex but tools like this can help us navigate the ocean of triggers out there so that we can *hopefully* have and enjoy better health.

Good luck!

Won't you please share?Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page